Settlement Agreements

Sometimes, an employee or worker is offered an amount of money (and/or other things such as a favourable reference) by their employer, to resolve a dispute.

As settlement agreements result in the person giving up their rights to bring claims in the Employment Tribunal, the agreement between them and the employer must include certain wording and the person must be advised by a “relevant independent adviser”. At YESS Law we have many years of experience of giving advice on settlement agreements.

Are you an employee or worker?

Where appropriate we will help you to negotiate the terms of the settlement agreement yourself, or we can speak to your employer on your behalf. We will explain the meaning and the effect of the document and make sure you have all the detail you need to make an informed decision as to whether to sign the agreement and move on from the situation.
We try where possible to work within the fee contribution offered by your employer. If additional work is necessary, we will agree fees with you beforehand.

Fees for advising on a settlement are typically between £350+VAT and £1000+VAT depending on the background to your case and how long it takes to reach a resolution.

For more information on the typical terms you can expect to see in a Settlement Agreement, have a look at our factsheet.

If you have any other questions please contact us. You can talk to one of our solicitors for up to 15 minutes’ free advice before deciding whether to instruct us to advise on your settlement agreement.

Are you an employer offering one or multiple settlement agreements to your staff?

If you have offered a settlement agreement to someone, or you are making redundancies or closing a site and offering enhanced payments under settlement agreements, you are welcome to give our details to individuals who ask you to suggest a legal adviser.

By arrangement, we can attend at your premises where there are multiple individuals who wish to instruct us.

Please contact us for further details.

Life's too short to litigate